Updates on Coronavirus  //  Read information about classes and office closures

The goal of this course is to enable the student to read Latin without the use of a dictionary or translation, and to read as fluently as one could read in French or Spanish. Latin is treated as a living language. Teaching methods commonly used for modern language acquisition are applied to Latin: total physical response (TPR), role-playing games, gradual complexity of dialogues and stories, and gradual grammatical progression. These learning methods will help the student to internalize grammatical forms and vocabulary. Latin will be the only language heard by the students throughout the course.

Classical Latin, taught in its broadest sense, includes the golden age of Latin literature (1st c. BC – 1st c. AD) as well as the Imperial Latin from the Nerva-Antonine dynasty (96-192 AD) and the Severan dynasty (193-235 AD). This period has the advantage of being an intermediate between pre-Classical Latin and Late Latin (3rd c.-6th c. AD). Even authors from the 4th or 5th centuries AD such as St. Augustine of Hippo or St. Jerome, albeit writing in a slightly different language than the classical one, took the golden age of Latin literature as a reference. Studying Classical Latin (in the broad sense) allows us to easily read the most interesting Latin texts of Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

Biblical Hebrew is the language of the Hebrew Bible. Written and composed over centuries during the 1st millennium B.C., the Hebrew Bible is widely considered the greatest literary achievement of the ancient Near East. Written mostly in Hebrew, it covers a vast range of literary genres and historical accounts. Covering a time span of centuries, a set of beliefs and practices, and unforgettable human figures.

In this course students will be fully immersed into the language from the very first lesson in all four major linguistic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The only language to be used in the classroom from the first moment will be Biblical Hebrew: verses from the Bible will be introduced from the beginning stages of the course, analyzed and discussed in Hebrew. Students will command each other in biblical Hebrew, as if they were King Solomon himself!

No prior knowledge is expected from the students, as the alphabet, grammar and vocabulary will be gradually taught and assimilated.

The Bible opens up to us a world deeply rooted in human history, sometimes very different from ours, often difficult to understand. It is one of the aims of this course, to get the students acquainted not only with this ancient language, but also with biblical civilization: the geography of ancient Israel and the ancient Near East, basic concepts, beliefs and practices of the ancient Israelites, their social structures, their kings, prophets, judges and priests, their genealogies, as well as their enemies.

As the Hebrew Bible is considered by Jews and Christians to be inspired by God, these texts will be studied with the utmost respect to the faith of each one.

By the end of the 5th semester (a total of 300 academic hours) students are expected to be able to handle a text of classical prose without an excessive use of a dictionary.

The textbook used in this course was written especially for these purposes by Eyal Nahum.

Arabic is the language of 22 Member States of UNESCO, a language with more than 422 million speakers in the Arab world (World Arabic Language Day, UNESCO, 18th December, 2012).

What is Arabic?

The Arabic language can be divided into three varieties:

Consequently, Arabic Language exists in a state of diglossia where its two separate registers (written and spoken) are used in different situations in life.

We offer both Spoken Arabic and MSA courses at Polis.

Why study at Polis?

The Spoken Arabic taught at Polis is the Palestinian Urban Arabic used in the central area of the country (Jerusalem), along with some explanations of dialectal issues and differences. The advantage of the Palestinian dialect is its closeness to the formal Arabic in pronunciation and vocabulary, a fact that makes it intelligible in other Arabic speaking areas.

Why study Spoken Arabic?

A new phenomenon is invading the Arabic Language! Starting recently, Spoken Arabic is being written for the first time, mostly thanks to technological innovations. Until now, Spoken Arabic has been taught using the Latin script. In Polis, however, Spoken Arabic is taught in Arabic and written in Arabic. The first course of Absolute Beginners includes teaching the alphabet, and candidates for other levels are required to know the script, Otherwise, they must study it by themselves or ask for private lessons in order to join the courses. Learning the script facilitates an authentic and direct approach to the language, and is a more natural way of introduction into the MSA.

So where to start: MSA or Spoken Arabic?

The answer depends on the academic or practical needs of the student. Starting with MSA, for instance, won't help the student hold a conversation in the street, but will help the student to read texts in formal Arabic.

In fact, most of our students need Arabic for practical daily use, and attend the Spoken Arabic courses.

Registration for both classes is also possible, and recommended for students who find themselves able to distinguish and assimilate the differences between the two linguistic varieties and with the sufficient time to dedicate for studying both courses.

To be fluent in Arabic you need both!

Modern Hebrew is one of the two official languages of Israel, used as first language by the majority of its citizens. It is spoken by around 9 million people worldwide, most of whom live in Israel. The roots of the Hebrew language are traced back to the first millennium B.C. which makes it one of the most ancient languages still spoken in the world today! Based on its classical sources (biblical, rabbinical & medieval) Hebrew was revived as a spoken language at the turn of the 20th century by a joint effort of intellectuals, teachers and educators, the most renowned of whom was Eliezer Ben-Yehuda to become what is today Modern (or Israeli) Hebrew, the modern form of the ancient language.

The goal of this course is to enable the student to read Latin without the use of a dictionary or translation, and to read as fluently as one could read in French or Spanish. Latin is treated as a living language. Teaching methods commonly used for modern language acquisition are applied to Latin: total physical response (TPR), role-playing games, gradual complexity of dialogues and stories, and gradual grammatical progression. These learning methods will help the student to internalize grammatical forms and vocabulary. Latin will be the only language heard by the students throughout the course.

Classical Latin, taught in its broadest sense, includes the golden age of Latin literature (1st c. BC – 1st c. AD) as well as the Imperial Latin from the Nerva-Antonine dynasty (96-192 AD) and the Severan dynasty (193-235 AD). This period has the advantage of being an intermediate between pre-Classical Latin and Late Latin (3rd c.-6th c. AD). Even authors from the 4th or 5th centuries AD such as St. Augustine of Hippo or St. Jerome, albeit writing in a slightly different language than the classical one, took the golden age of Latin literature as a reference. Studying Classical Latin (in the broad sense) allows us to easily read the most interesting Latin texts of Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

Biblical Hebrew is the language of the Hebrew Bible. Written and composed over centuries during the 1st millennium B.C., the Hebrew Bible is widely considered the greatest literary achievement of the ancient Near East. Written mostly in Hebrew, it covers a vast range of literary genres and historical accounts. Covering a time span of centuries, a set of beliefs and practices, and unforgettable human figures.

In this course students will be fully immersed into the language from the very first lesson in all four major linguistic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The only language to be used in the classroom from the first moment will be Biblical Hebrew: verses from the Bible will be introduced from the beginning stages of the course, analyzed and discussed in Hebrew. Students will command each other in biblical Hebrew, as if they were King Solomon himself!

No prior knowledge is expected from the students, as the alphabet, grammar and vocabulary will be gradually taught and assimilated.

The Bible opens up to us a world deeply rooted in human history, sometimes very different from ours, often difficult to understand. It is one of the aims of this course, to get the students acquainted not only with this ancient language, but also with biblical civilization: the geography of ancient Israel and the ancient Near East, basic concepts, beliefs and practices of the ancient Israelites, their social structures, their kings, prophets, judges and priests, their genealogies, as well as their enemies.

As the Hebrew Bible is considered by Jews and Christians to be inspired by God, these texts will be studied with the utmost respect to the faith of each one.

By the end of the 5th semester (a total of 300 academic hours) students are expected to be able to handle a text of classical prose without an excessive use of a dictionary.

The textbook used in this course was written especially for these purposes by Eyal Nahum.

Arabic is the language of 22 Member States of UNESCO, a language with more than 422 million speakers in the Arab world (World Arabic Language Day, UNESCO, 18th December, 2012).

What is Arabic?

The Arabic language can be divided into three varieties:

Consequently, Arabic Language exists in a state of diglossia where its two separate registers (written and spoken) are used in different situations in life.

We offer both Spoken Arabic and MSA courses at Polis.

So where to start: MSA or Spoken Arabic?

The answer depends on the academic or practical needs of the student. Starting with MSA, for instance, won't help the student hold a conversation in the street, but will help the student to read texts in formal Arabic.

In fact, most of our students need Arabic for practical daily use, and attend the Spoken Arabic courses.

At Polis, we teach at the same time Attic and Koine Greek. The teacher communicates in high Koine Greek which includes almost all Attic features and, when necessary, teaches the difference between the two dialects. Ninety per cent of all Greek texts of Antiquity were written in Koine Greek. These texts range from philosophy and medicine to poetry and novels, it is the original language of the New Testament, the Septuagint and many ancient Jewish and Christian texts. As many of today’s physical and social sciences originated with Ancient Greeks, knowledge of this language is the key to understanding the birth of Western culture.

The course at Polis is intended to familiarize students with the language through natural learning methods. From the first day, all lessons are conducted in Ancient Greek using techniques based on the way children acquire their mother tongue, allowing the students to develop a keen intuition in understanding and speaking the language. The course is designed to provide speaking skills that, with practice, will allow the student to store new information in long-term memory, reading skills that will allow the student to approach original texts without reliance on translations and written exercises which will enable students to perfect their mastery of this ancient and beautiful language.

At Polis, we teach at the same time Attic and Koine Greek. The teacher communicates in high Koine Greek which includes almost all Attic features and, when necessary, teaches the difference between the two dialects. Ninety per cent of all Greek texts of Antiquity were written in Koine Greek. These texts range from philosophy and medicine to poetry and novels, it is the original language of the New Testament, the Septuagint and many ancient Jewish and Christian texts. As many of today’s physical and social sciences originated with Ancient Greeks, knowledge of this language is the key to understanding the birth of Western culture.

The course at Polis is intended to familiarize students with the language through natural learning methods. From the first day, all lessons are conducted in Ancient Greek using techniques based on the way children acquire their mother tongue, allowing the students to develop a keen intuition in understanding and speaking the language. The course is designed to provide speaking skills that, with practice, will allow the student to store new information in long-term memory, reading skills that will allow the student to approach original texts without reliance on translations and written exercises which will enable students to perfect their mastery of this ancient and beautiful language.

Biblical Hebrew is the language of the Hebrew Bible. Written and composed over centuries during the 1st millennium B.C., the Hebrew Bible is widely considered the greatest literary achievement of the ancient Near East. Written mostly in Hebrew, it covers a vast range of literary genres and historical accounts. Covering a time span of centuries, a set of beliefs and practices, and unforgettable human figures.

In this course students will be fully immersed into the language from the very first lesson in all four major linguistic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The only language to be used in the classroom from the first moment will be Biblical Hebrew: verses from the Bible will be introduced from the beginning stages of the course, analyzed and discussed in Hebrew. Students will command each other in biblical Hebrew, as if they were King Solomon himself!

No prior knowledge is expected from the students, as the alphabet, grammar and vocabulary will be gradually taught and assimilated.

The Bible opens up to us a world deeply rooted in human history, sometimes very different from ours, often difficult to understand. It is one of the aims of this course, to get the students acquainted not only with this ancient language, but also with biblical civilization: the geography of ancient Israel and the ancient Near East, basic concepts, beliefs and practices of the ancient Israelites, their social structures, their kings, prophets, judges and priests, their genealogies, as well as their enemies.

As the Hebrew Bible is considered by Jews and Christians to be inspired by God, these texts will be studied with the utmost respect to the faith of each one.

By the end of the 5th semester (a total of 300 academic hours) students are expected to be able to handle a text of classical prose without an excessive use of a dictionary.

The textbook used in this course was written especially for these purposes by Eyal Nahum.