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Fluency Program
Language Course

Theoretical Courses

Overview

Polis offers our Academic Students a wide variety of theoretical courses as part of their degree. When possible, we also aim to make these courses available to members of the public who wish to enhance their knowledge. Please note: students need to submit a written request in order to join the theoretical course and attach a copy of their CV.  The instructor and the Head of Program will then review the letter and CV and decide whether they will be able to participate

Enrollment

Open

Program Dates

Oct 12, 2020 – Feb 8, 2021

Location

Jerusalem, (US Time)

Courses

Arabic in Media

Total Hours

15 Academic Hours

Dates

November 10, 2020 – December 8, 2020

Schedule

Tuesdays, 17:30-20:00 (GMT +3) : November 10, 17, 24 | December 1, 8

Tuition

ILS 525 / Semester

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OBJECTIVE The course is based on reading Arabic newspapers, magazines and other sources on current events, as well as listening to native speakers talking about issues such as, the Arab Media, the Question of Palestine, Arab American Relations, Globalization and its impact on Arab society and culture etc. The material selected is suitable for intermediate and advanced students of Arabic and will include, among other things, editorial and commentary articles. The course will be conducted entirely in Arabic. By being exposed to a variety of media sources in Arabic and topics of interest to the Arab media, students will be able to: A. Express their ideas more effectively in Arabic on a more advanced level. B. Improve their comprehension skills in Arabic. C. Gradually start thinking in Arabic while speaking rather than translating from their native language.

METHODOLOGY After reading each article we will: A. Present and analyze new vocabulary. B. Discuss content and meaning of the article through questions that the professor prepares. C. Analyze new grammatical issues that arise in the article.

MODE OF ASSESSMENT Final grade for this course will be based on: Final exam

Professor Elias SALFITY

Critical Apparatus

Total Hours

15 Academic Hours

Dates

January 25, 2021 – February 5, 2021

Schedule

January 25 - February 5, 2021 9:00-10:35 (Mondays and Wednesdays) + 9:00-11:45 (Fridays)

Tuition

ILS 525 / Semester

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OBJECTIVE
Introduction to the transmission of Greek and Latin texts and the critical edition with the goal of illustrating the elements needed to read a critical apparatus.

METHODOLOGY
A theoretical introduction with examples and several exercises of reading.

MODE OF ASSESMENT
A written commentary to one apparatus of half difficulty. The questions of the students during the lessons will also be taken into account.

PROGRAM
1. Introduction to ancient book: materials and manuscript's preparation.
2. The work of the scribe.
3 . Notions of Paleography.
4 . The textual tradition.
5 . Analysis of the copy mistakes.
6 . How to read a critical edition?
7 . Exercises: reading a critical edition I.
8 . Exercises: reading a critical edition II.
9 . Exercises: reading the Nestle-Aland's New Testament critical edition.
10. Critical bibliography

Jeronimo Leal

Greek Lunch I/III

Level I
Level III

Total Hours

30 Academic Hours

Dates

October 12, 2020 – February 8, 2021

Schedule

Monday-Thursday: Jerusalem: 13:00-13:45 (GMT+3) + Online participation

Tuition

ILS 1,850

OBJECTIVE: To promote conversation in Greek in a more informal environment, as well as to introduce the students toeveryday objects, vocabulary and expressions for a variety of topics. The class will be in full Greek immersion. It will primarily consist of conversation, with some TPR, reading,and other elements of the Polis method. Students, as leaders, will present topics of their choice and lead their peers in discussions or activities throughout the semester

Students must have completed Ancient Greek Level II or III with Polis - or pass a placement test in order to enroll.

Total Hours

30 Academic Hours

Dates

October 12, 2020 – February 8, 2021

Schedule

Monday-Thursday: Jerusalem: 13:00-13:45 (GMT+3) + Online participation

Tuition

ILS 1,850

OBJECTIVE: To promote conversation in Greek in a more informal environment, as well as to introduce the students toeveryday objects, vocabulary and expressions for a variety of topics. The class will be in full Greek immersion. It will primarily consist of conversation, with some TPR, reading,and other elements of the Polis method. Students, as leaders, will present topics of their choice and lead their peers in discussions or activities throughout the semester

Students must have completed Ancient Greek IV or V with Polis - or pass a placement test in order to enroll.

More Information

There will be one group in Jerusalem time with the option of participating online.

(Please note: it is not necessary to submit a CV - but students will be required to write a short letter outlining their level in Ancient Greek in order to be accepted to the course by the coordinator)

Greek Readings 1a/1b

1a (Platonic Myths)
1b (Aristotle's Rhetoric)

Total Hours

30 Academic Hours

Dates

October 13, 2020 – December 1, 2020

Schedule

Jerusalem: Tuesday/Thursday 17:45-19:15 (GMT+3) + Online participation

OBJECTIVE Be able to read and comment in Ancient Greek a representative selection of Platonic Myths. Recognize the characteristics of the myths in opposition to the dialectical parts.

PREREQUISITES
Ancient Greek II or Placement Test

Total Hours

30 Academic Hours

Dates

December 3, 2020 – February 4, 2021

Schedule

Jerusalem: Tuesday/Thursday 17:45-19:15 (GMT+3) + Online participation

Tuition

ILS 1,850

OBJECTIVE
Be able to read and comment in Ancient Greek certain parts. Know the distinction among the means of persuasion, the species of public speech, questions of style, and parts of a speech.

PREREQUISITES
Ancient Greek II or Placement Test

More Information

There will be one group in Jerusalem time with the option of participating online.

(Please note: it is not necessary to submit a CV - but students will be required to write a short letter outlining their level in Ancient Greek in order to be accepted to the course by the coordinator)

Greek Readings IIIa/b

IIIa (Joseph and Aseneth)
IIIb (Aesop's Logoi/Fabulae)

Total Hours

30 Academic Hours

Dates

October 13, 2020 – December 1, 2020

Schedule

Tuesday/Thursday- Jerusalem: 11:15-12:45 (GMT+3) + Online Participation

Tuition

ILS 1,850

PROGRAM
The class will mainly focus on reading, interpreting and summarizing the apocryphal Jewish
Hellenistic romance Joseph and Aseneth (according to Burchard’s 2003 Brill edition) and will include
cross-readings with the Septuagint (Genesis, Exodus). Reviewing the source text’s narrative will not only provide an example and a practice for storytelling in authentic Greek, but also basic vocabulary on human life such as housing, feelings, society, religion, as well as provide questions on the text interpretation with the genre and origins (a Jewish text from Egyptian diaspora, a Christian
rewriting?). Grammatical aspects will be treated in parallel to Greek III’s curriculum, and focus on the role of aorist tenses and participles in Greek storytelling, and of adjectives in description. Short episodes from this dramatic romance will be acted out accordingly.

OBJECTIVE
An encounter with Koine and Septuagint-like Greek and storytelling through an Apocryphal
expansion of the Old Testament. Introducing or reviewing Greek III’s grammatical concepts and
frequent life terminology through the source text.

PREREQUISITES
Ancient Greek II or Placement Test

Total Hours

30 Academic Hours

Dates

December 3, 2020 – February 4, 2021

Schedule

Tuesday/Thursday- Jerusalem: 11:15-12:45 (GMT+3) + Online Participation

Tuition

ILS 1,850

OBJECTIVE
A first encounter with Aesop’s Greek storytelling. Introducing or reviewing Greek III’s grammatical
concepts and frequent life terminology through the source text.

PROGRAM
The class will focus on reading and summarizing long standing popular fables from Aesop’s
collection of Logoi (according to 2005 German Reclams Universal-Bibliothek edition). Reviewing the source text’s narrative will not only provide an example for storytelling in authentic Greek fables, but also basic vocabulary on animals, interaction and movements, as well as reveal text interpretation
with the genre’s ethical moral. Grammatical aspects will be treated in parallel to Greek III’s curriculum, and focus on the role of aorist tense and participles in Greek storytelling, as well as introduce the polyvalent conjunction ὡς. Short passages from this oral tradition will be recited accordingly.

PREREQUISITES
Ancient Greek II or Placement Test

More Information

There will be one group in Jerusalem time with the option of participating online.

(Please note: it is not necessary to submit a CV - but students will be required to write a short letter outlining their level in Ancient Greek in order to be accepted to the course by the coordinator)

Historical Geography III

Total Hours

20 Academic Hours

Dates

October 14, 2020 – January 20, 2021

Schedule

October 14, 2020 - January 20, 2021 9:00-10:30 (Wednesday) + All Day (Friday)

Tuition

ILS 2,800 / Semester

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OBJECTIVE
This course aims at providing students coming from different branches of Humanities with basic notions on the history and geography of the Holy Land. Visits of sites will serve as case studies illustrating phenomena such as the encounter between the Semitic and the Hellenic cultures, the transition between the classical civilization and the Islamic world, etc.

METHODOLOGY
Preparation sessions will deal with major historical and geographical landmarks of the sites visited during the field trips. Short readings from primary or secondary sources may be asked to complete the information. During the field trips, in addition to the explanations of the instructor, students will often be asked to read primary sources describing a specific site in their original language (Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Arabic, Aramaic), and to assess the evolution of buildings with the help of plans and maps. 7 preparation sessions and 7 field trips

MODE OF ASSESMENT
A short essay (1,500 words) or a guiding point during a field trip.

PROGRAM
1. East of the Old City: Slopes of Mt Olives, Kidron Valley.
2. Nazareth & Sepphoris: Lower Galilee in the Roman-Byzantine periods.
3. South of the Old City: Kettef Hinnom, Mt Zion.
4. Judean Desert 1: Qumran & Qasr al-Yahud (baptismal site).
5. Judean Desert 2: Byzantine monasteries.
6. Mamluk Jerusalem: Temple Mount and Muslim Quarter.
7. Hebron

Note: each unit includes a preparation session and a field trip.

Henri Gourinard

History of the Near East I

Total Hours

12 Academic Hours

Dates

October 23, 2020 – January 8, 2021

Schedule

October 23, 2020 - January 8, 2021 9:00-10:30 (Fridays)

Tuition

ILS 700 / Semester

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OBJECTIVE
This course intends to provide graduate students with the historical context and the geographical landmarks needed to engage in fields such as Near Eastern languages and ancient philology. It covers the Hellenistic and Roman periods of the history of the Near East – with a special focus on Judea. It does not pretend to give a comprehensive and chronological overview of these periods, but rather to approach some important questions such as the diffusion of and resistance to Hellenism.

METHODOLOGY
This course is designed both as a lecture and as a seminar. Students will be asked to prepare for each session by reading shorts excerpts taken from ancient authors and scholar articles. Sessions in class will include lecture, study of texts, and discussion based on the preparation made by the students.

MODE OF ASSESMENT
A 2,000-word essay or a take-home exam.

PROGRAM
HNE 1: Classical Antiquity
1. The Near East of Alexander the Great
2. The Jews and the Greeks under Ptolemaic Rule
3. Judea under the Seleucid. The Maccabean Revolt
4. Rome’s gradual involvement in Syria
5. The Age of Herod and the Procurators
6. Judea from the Great Revolt to Bar Kochba

Henri Gourinard

Introduction to Hebrew Literature

Total Hours

15 Academic Hours

Dates

October 21, 2020 – January 7, 2021

Schedule

October 21, 2020-January 7, 2021 9:00-10:35 (Wednesdays) (Two additional clases on January 5th and 7th)

Tuition

ILS 525 / Semester

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OBJECTIVE
This course intends to draw a trajectory of the development of Jewish literature from antiquity to modern times, relying only on texts written in Hebrew (which will be provided in translation). Auerbach describes the differences between Jewish and Greek approaches to reality, noticing the gap between Biblical laconicism, purposefulness and amorphousness, and the abundance of details in the epic narrative of Homer. A compilation of these two approaches forms the basis, according to Auerbach, of Western European literature. Jewish literature, like European, is also not monolithic, but a product of the interaction of Jewish with the surrounding cultures. By reading passages from works that are different and distant from each other and that were written in Hebrew, we will try to see in these fragments of literary texts processes of continuity and transformation.

METHODOLOGY
We will take a diachronic approach to the themes, exploring different subjects in Hebrew literature through history. Each week we will look at theoretical texts in conjunction with primary material. This will help us develop sophisticated ways of reading; it will also give us an insight into academic discourses in the field. Though we are reading translations, at certain points over the semester we will look at fragments of material in the original language. Narrow readings in the original language will complement our broader readings in translation, allowing us a feel for different authors’ styles of writing and a glimpse at how the Hebrew language changed over the course of time. Classes will be conducted in seminar style. Students will be expected to read the material ahead of each meeting in preparation for a class discussion. A brochure with selected texts will be sent to students prior to the start of the course.

MODE OF ASSESMENT
Preliminary assignment: 3 reading reports (1 page max.)
Grade: 30%- preliminary assignment; 70%- writing assignment (4 page max.) integrating two pieces (prose or verse) of Hebrew literature.

PROGRAM
1. Wisdom Literature: Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Ben Sirah, Tractate Avot
2. Storytelling from Bible to Second Temple and in Rabbinic Period: Jonah, Tobit, and others
3. Re-written Bible and Midrash: Jubilees and Midrash Bereshit Rabba
4. Poetry: Psalms, Qumran, Jose ben Jose, Yanai, Qalir

5. Medieval story telling Pseudo Ben Sira, Maase Jerushalmi, Sefer Zerubavel
6. From Haskala Literature to Brenner and Agnon
7. From medieval poetry to Bialik, Amichai and Pagis

 

Reuven Kipperwasser

Islamic Modernity in Modern and Contemporary Arab Thought 

Total Hours

15 Academic Hours

Dates

November 5, 2020 – December 10, 2020

Schedule

November 5 - December 10, 2020 9:00-11:00 (Thursdays)

Tuition

ILS 525 / Semester

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Elias Salfity

Issues in Teaching Ancient Languages

Total Hours

15 Academic Hours

Dates

October 13, 2020 – November 17, 2020

Schedule

October 13 - November 17, 2020 14:00-16:00 (Tuesdays)

Tuition

ILS 525 / Semester

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OBJECTIVE
To offer a general overview of the history of teaching ancient languages (bibliography, history of teaching techniques).

CONTENTS
NB: This course will take place in six session of 2 time-hours each (2.5 academic hours)
Session 1: Major theories in cognitive psychology (time versus aspect acquisition, acquisition of writing and reading skills, etc.) History and development of some theories of second language teaching (Francois Gouin, Ulpan method, TPR) (2.5 hrs.) - Tuesday, October 13th 14:00-16:00
Session 2: History and development of some theories of second language teaching (TPRS, Story building, Comprehensive input, Where are your keys, Rassias, etc.) (2.5 hrs.) - Tuesday, October 20th 14:00-16:00
Session 3: Brief history of Biblical Hebrew, Arabic, Greek and Latin teaching to date (2.5 hrs.) - Tuesday, October 27th 14:00-16:00
a) Hebrew (Ivrit min hahatchala, etc.)
b) Arabic
c) Greek (Rouse, Athenaze, etc.)
d) Latin (Avellanus, Familia Romana and Orberg, Piper Salve, etc.)
Session 4: The Sixth Renaissance (2.5 hrs.) - Tuesday, November 3rd 14:00-16:00
Session 5: Institutions (2.5 hrs.) - Tuesday, November 10th 14:00-16:00
Session 6: Overview of the extant bibliography of Greek/Latin teaching (2.5 hrs.) - Tuesday, November 17th 14:00-16:00
METHODOLOGY

For each session, the teacher will explain the theory and introduce the students to the literature. For some sessions, previous reading may be required. MODE OF ASSESSMENT
A small paper (5 pages) on one or some of the points 1 to 5 or a short discussion with the instructor, who will ask general questions about the contents of the course.

Teresa Lopez de Tejada

Jewish Feasts

Total Hours

5 Academic Hours

Dates

October 21, 2020 – December 2, 2020

Schedule

October 21 - December 2, 2020 11:00-12:30 (Wednesday)

Tuition

ILS 175 / Semester

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OBJECTIVE
In this course, we will introduce you to the special times and terms of the Jewish religion. Our discussion will naturally begin by mentioning these sacral times and seasons in the Bible. We will see, however, that the biblical presentation of the content of the festivals and the primary duties of the celebration is very concise and often understated. Understanding how the missing elements were filled during the era of the Second Temple and, mainly, in Rabbinic Judaism will be the main task of our course so that the student gains a basic understanding of the subject.

METHODOLOGY
Each lesson will begin by reading the appropriate Bible passages, and if possible, with the corresponding passages in the Rabbinic literature, for the main thematic units, see below. Classes will be conducted in the seminar-style. Students are expected to read the material ahead of each meeting in preparation for a class discussion. A brochure with selected texts will be shared with students before the start of the course.

MODE OF ASSESMENT
Final exam or final paper

PROGRAM
1. Sabbath
2. High Holy Days
3. Three Pilgrimage Feasts
4. Days of Mourning and no-mourning

Reuven Kipperwasser

Medieval Sources

Total Hours

20 Academic Hours

Dates

October 15, 2020 – December 17, 2020

Schedule

October 15-December 17, 2020 9:00-10:30 (Thursday)

Tuition

ILS 700 / Semester

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COURSE DESCRIPTION
Linguistic communication is a unique human ability that involves words and other signs, as well as all external and internal senses, in order to achieve comprehension and convey meaning.
The science of semiotics, which has developed in recent times linked to the names of F. de Saussure and C.S. Peirce, studies the nature and role of signs in communication in general and in human communication in particular (linguistic and non-linguistic). The most recent research in this field has stressed the contribution of ancient and medieval thinkers to forging its main principles, but the study of the extent of this contribution is still in its beginning stages.
This course is devoted to examining the main literary and conceptual sources of the medieval debate on the nature and processes of human communication, and it will be structured as a short introduction to the early history of semiotics.

OBJECTIVE
The objective of this course is twofold: On one hand, to understand the articulation between reality, knowledge, and language by reflecting on the various elements that play a role in human communication, with a focus on the nature of signs, their key role in the acquisition of knowledge and in its transmission through interpersonal communication. On the other, to introduce the most relevant ancient and medieval authors that have contributed to this debate and to the birth of semiotics.

METHODOLOGY
The methodology of this course is text-based. The lecturer will make the material available to students, who will be required to read it beforehand. During the session, the lecturer will introduce the author/work studied and its historical-intellectual context and students will read from excerpts of the texts, followed by a discussion and an explanation of the main terms and notions involved.

MODE OF ASSESMENT
20% Participation in class (questions, answers, comments)

80% Either a 20-min. oral presentation or a written paper (between 1,000 and 1,500 words in Times New Roman pt. 12, 1,5 space) with selected bibliography on a topic among those included in the program. The topic should be approved by the lecturer beforehand.
Assessment will take into account:
- Logical structure of the presentation (introduction, argument development, personal analysis of the elements treated, and clarity/relevance of the conclusion/s);
- Contents: Use of material and readings covered during the course, discussion of original ancient terminology, and use of bibliographical resources other than those read for the course will be a bonus for final grade. PROGRAM
- Semiotics: Some historical and conceptual highlights.
- Knowledge of truth and its communication: Plato.
- The peculiar nature of words. Sign and symbol: Aristotle.
- The problematic status of the category of relation: Aristotle.
- Contributions on the nature of human knowledge and communication: Hippocrates, Sextus Empiricus, Ammonius, Diogenes Laertius, Plotin, Origen, Cicero, Philo.
- The nature of signs and the transmission of knowledge: Augustine of Hippo.
- Medieval reception of classical Greek and Latin sources (I): Boethius, Peter Lombard.
- Medieval reception of classical Greek and Latin sources (II): Intentionality, Sign, ratio and relation in Thomas Aquinas.
- Medieval reception of Arabic sources: Interpretation and truth in Ibn Rushd / Averroes.
- Medieval reception of Hebrew sources: The problem of biblical language in Moshe ben Maimon / Maimonides.

Dr. Mercedes Rubio

Phonetics and Phonology

Total Hours

20 Academic Hours

Dates

October 13, 2020 – December 15, 2020

Schedule

October 13-December 15, 2020 9:00-10:30 (Tuesday)

Tuition

ILS 700 / Semester

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OBJECTIVE
The course is an introduction to phonetics and phonology of natural languages (both ancient and living), the sound system, and phonetic laws. The phonetic phenomena and examples are driven mainly from the languages studied in Polis.

METHODOLOGY
The course will include lectures, class exercises, and reading assignments.

MODE OF ASSESMENT
Class participation (class exercises, oral assignments, attendance) is worth 40 % of the final grade. A final exam at the end of the semester is worth 60 % of the final grade.

PROGRAM
1. Introduction: organs of speech; articulation
2. Consonants
3. Vowels
4. Prosody: length, stress, syllable, pitch, break
5. Phonemes, allophones
6. Phonology and spelling
7. Phonological rule
8. Suprasegmental units; intonation
9. Sound change

 

Tania Notarius

Patristic Sources

Total Hours

15 Academic Hours

Schedule

February, 4 2021 9:00-10:30 (Thursday)15

Tuition

ILS 525 / Semester

The Seven Seals Pt. I

Total Hours

20 Academic Hours

Dates

October 12, 2020 – December 14, 2020

Schedule

October 12-December 14, 2020 9:00-10:30 (Mondays)

Tuition

ILS 700 / Semester

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OBJECTIVE
An overview on The Didache, First Letter of Clement of Rome to the Corinthians, the Letters of Ignatius, the Apologies of Justin, and the Letter to Diognetus; and a deep knowledge of one of these works.

METHODOLOGY
Students must read the bibliography independently (after the initial in-person session) and complete a final assignment during the Spring semester.

MODE OF ASSESMENT
A paper with a commentary on one of the works studied.

PROGRAM
• Introduction (in-person)
• Reading Quasten vol. 1 (only the introduction and the works mentioned in the following paragraph). I will provide the text of Quasten.
• Reading of The Didache, First Letter of St. Clement of Rome to the Corinthians, the Letters of Ignatius, the Apologies of Justin, and the Letter to Diognetus in English translation (the texts can be found in https://www.ccel.org/fathers or https://www.newadvent.org/fathers/).
• Reading in Greek of one of these works (http://www.ccel.org/ccel/lake/fathers2.toc.html).
• Analyze the English translation of the chosen text.

Christophe Rico

The Notion of God

Total Hours

10 Academic Hours

Dates

January 8, 2021 – January 28, 2021

Schedule

January 8-28, 2021 9:00-10:30 (Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays)

Tuition

ILS 350 / Semester

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OBJECTIVE
Is the image of God the same in the Tanakh, the Christian Bible and the Qur’an? How is the idea of God according to the three scriptures considered as revelation?
The aim is to extract from the three scriptures, some features of how God is presented, taking into account his actions and the relation with men according to the books.
The course has a complement every second year with the one called: The Notion of God According to Tanakh, Christian Bible and Qur’an: God and the Scriptures.

METHODOLOGY
There will be presentations according to the program, leaving time to discussions. The texts (Tanakh, Christian Bible and Qur’an) will be used mostly in English, pointing out some specific aspects in the original languages. The knowledge of Hebrew, Greek and Arabic is not required to follow the course.
The idea is to understand how is God presented in each one of these scriptures, using the early traditions in some cases for clarifications. The focus, then, will be in reading the scripture itself, more than in further interpretations or in the evolution of the religions afterwards.

MODE OF ASSESMENT
Students may prepare a presentation to the class or a paper about a subject related to the program; it could be also a commentary of an article or a chapter of a book.

PROGRAM
God’s actions and relations with men
1. Introduction
2. God’s actions
God’s freedom
The creation and the creator
Violence from God or in his name
3. God in relation with man
Descriptions of personal experiences of God
God’s knowledge of the future
Justice and mercy

Heaven and hell
4. The answer of man towards God
What does it mean to please God?
Attitudes towards God
God in ordinary life
5. Conclusions: Three Portraits of God

 

Professor Joaquin Paniello

Translation Theory

Total Hours

15 Academic Hours

Dates

January 4, 2021 – February 8, 2021

Schedule

January 4-February 8, 2021

Tuition

ILS 525 / Semester

More Information

Please email [email protected] for schedule

 

OBJECTIVE
Understanding the way meaning works in a specific text and the main principles of translation that should be applied. Becoming able to appreciate the quality of a specific translation, taking into account the implied reader.

METHODOLOGY
The student has to reflect on the documents given to him at the end of each class (samples of translations, theoretic articles) and, in the following one, participate in the class according to the specific problematic that those documents imply.

MODE OF ASSESMENT
Short research work in English (10 pages): analysis of a specific ancient or modern translation

PROGRAM
1) Translations risks (idea and referent; langue and parole; words and text; idiolect; signified and style)
2) Translations limits (translation of contents and figures; semiotization; translation of signifiers; loan words; translating tradition)
3) The tools of the translator (concordances, papyri, ancient versions and commentaries)

Professor Christophe Rico

How to Apply
Fees

Admissions

You will need to submit your CV and a letter of request in order to be accepted to the program. The instructor and the Head of Program will review the letter and CV and decide whether you will be able to participate.

Fees

Registration Fee

ILS 350

Students who have been accepted to a program will be asked to confirm their attendance by paying the registration fee which is part of the total tuition fee for the academic year when they begin their studies.

Tuition Fee
Arabic Folklore and Popular StoriesArabic in MediaCritical ApparatusGreek Lunch I/III
Level I
Greek Lunch I/III
Level III
Greek Readings 1a/1b
1a (Platonic Myths)
Greek Readings 1a/1b
1b (Aristotle's Rhetoric)
Greek Readings IIIa/b
IIIa (Joseph and Aseneth)
Greek Readings IIIa/b
IIIb (Aesop's Logoi/Fabulae)
Historical Geography IIIHistory of the Near East IIntroduction to Hebrew LiteratureIslamic Modernity in Modern and Contemporary Arab Thought Issues in Teaching Ancient LanguagesJewish FeastsMedieval SourcesPhonetics and PhonologyPatristic SourcesThe Seven Seals Pt. IThe Notion of GodTranslation Theory
ILS 350 / semesterILS 525 / semesterILS 525 / semesterILS 1,850ILS 1,850ILS 1,850ILS 1,850ILS 1,850ILS 2,800 / semesterILS 700 / semesterILS 525 / semesterILS 525 / semesterILS 525 / semesterILS 175 / semesterILS 700 / semesterILS 700 / semesterILS 525 / semesterILS 700 / semesterILS 350 / semesterILS 525 / semester